Mush Online Training



  • Ok peeps.

    This is my suggestion. We hold classes on how to mush.

    This will include passing knowledge of coding for those specific 'classes' and for learning how to socially interact with others in a mush medium. This would include social and RP mushes.

    Coding is a no-brainer. We would talk about both softcoding on a mush and hardcoding on a mush. Those of us who are experienced will talk about things to watch out for on advanced systems. For those who are active with Evennia or AresMUSH we could do similar. While I know python and ruby I don't know either codebase well enough to talk about coding for those, so others will have to take over that spot. But then that's why I'm reaching out to you all :)

    Now, I want to specifically touch on the social interaction. This is a very dangerous kettle of fish as each person has their own style and each mush has their own needs.

    So my thoughts on social interaction is a study on what not to do over what to do.

    Basically pass on all the faux paus and mistakes we've all been through. Things not to do. Like when you went too far in administering a game and chased people off. Or those times you wish you put your foot down harder than you did. Basically have a course on what you learned with 20/20 hindsight so others can learn from our mistakes.

    Because I think if we instill into people what not to do. Finding what they can do will be all the more easy and enjoyable for them.

    I think having scheduled training sessions on a central calendar where people can show up would also help bring in new people. One of the biggest things for new people is the steep learning curve, so let's combat that.

    Thoughts?

    Edit:

    Because it honestly was such a great idea, I quoted @apos post here:

    @ashen-shugar I personally might further divide it up into useful sub topics for social like, "How do you get involved in stories", "How do you handle conflicts you find oocly frustrating", "What are the differences between MU RP and other rp formats", etc. That might keep people's input more focused.


  • Pitcrew

    I think to social part would be hard to teach since there is no one set standard. Take something as simple as joining a scene in progress on the grid. (Not wanting to restart that at all just using an example) Not only do different games have different protocols but also a lot of players feel very strongly on it in very different ways. I would be wary of teaching a new person what is acceptable based on on game or group of games and then having that person instead be drawn to a different group of games. Entering with incorrect knowledge can often be worse than entering with no knowledge at all.



  • @thatguythere Yeah, I think once you compiled the list of everyone saying what they think is a dreadful faux paus, the poor new player would be navigating an impossible minefield of things that might piss somebody off.

    While that's probably an accurate depiction of the new-person MU experience, I don't think it's all that helpful.



  • @ashen-shugar I personally might further divide it up into useful sub topics for social like, "How do you get involved in stories", "How do you handle conflicts you find oocly frustrating", "What are the differences between MU RP and other rp formats", etc. That might keep people's input more focused.


  • Pitcrew Banned



  • @thatguythere said in Mush Online Training:

    I think to social part would be hard to teach since there is no one set standard.

    Oh, I fully agree on this. It's a quagmire and why I stated it's different for each person and each environment you play on.

    It's why I stressed it's good to just touch on things you found not to do. No set examples, but overall generalizations.

    Things that for us would be no brainers like mass-mailing people when you're disgruntled hate-mail could be covered and consequences of those actions. Things that can be applicable to most situations, and not nitch-groups is what I'm looking for if that helps clarify?

    @nemesis said in Mush Online Training:

    http://mushcode.com/

    http://graphcomp.com/info/mud/pennmush/guide-single.html

    https://www.aresmush.com/articles/practical-mush-coding/

    Yes, I know there's online tutorials. But having classroom based learning is always a better way to pass on knowledge as it can do some question and answer sessions not available by page-flipping.

    I also have a ton of helpful links at the end of my what to do when your mush is attacked link.



  • I like suggestions from @Apos . Seems better than what to do and not do OOC sociallly. Even on the same game what is and isn't accepted can vary from group to group.



  • You can start it as an online discussion if that seems helpful.

    However, it would do best as a web page or wiki. Documentation is there when you need it.



  • @misadventure said in Mush Online Training:

    You can start it as an online discussion if that seems helpful.

    However, it would do best as a web page or wiki. Documentation is there when you need it.

    You know, this gets me thinking.

    There are people who have made interactive on-line tutorials for python, ruby, bash/shell scripting, php, html, and various other languages.

    Why couldn't we do something similar with mush code?

    I am absolute crap at web design, but for those of you who are experienced at it, what do you think it'd take to do something like that?

    Do you think it would be worthwhile?

    I obviously don't want people to invest time if it'll never be used.



  • @ashen-shugar I did an interactive tutorial for the FS3 combat system. The Ares tutorials are interactive, but require a game. I could have done them with javascript like the combat one but it just wasn't worth the effort.


  • Pitcrew

    Just putting out there, I wrote this:

    Yggy's Guide to ECO Combat



  • @faraday said in Mush Online Training:

    @ashen-shugar I did an interactive tutorial for the FS3 combat system. The Ares tutorials are interactive, but require a game. I could have done them with javascript like the combat one but it just wasn't worth the effort.

    Hey that's really clever.


  • Pitcrew

    @Ashen-Shugar I could hunt around and see if I still have any of the old logfiles from our AdminMUSH days.


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