New Comic/Superhero Themed MU*



  • So, I'm new to MSB, and still a relatively new player to MUs in general. I have noticed a trend among the games that I've played on, and maybe it's universal or inevitable. But I feel the need to try to correct it. Most MUs I've encountered are prone to favoritism or just inconsistency/craziness by staff. Either it's a clique game where headstaffers' pals get all the glory, or it's just a situation where staff is less than ideal with dealing with issues in a fair and impartial manner.

    It's something that I want to change.

    So, I'm looking to start up a new game. I'm going with superhero based because it's fairly freeform, and easy to do with little coding. The focus is mostly simply on RP and storytelling. Less mechanics and systems to deal with.

    The idea is to get some people together who can be fair and impartial, and run plots for people. Staff will be responsible for moderating each other, as much as moderating the players. No single individual has the absolute say-so (I'm looking at BNW, Elsa) and there won't be instances where staff sticks up for other staff members when they do skeevy things (Like things I've seen happen on Comux).

    I don't know the first thing about setting a game up, or coding. I'm just a moron with a head full of ideas for stories and theme, and a dream of a game where people can actually go and not have to worry about insane or just blatantly corrupt staff. A drama free environment that encourages cooperation and roleplaying.

    Is there anyone out there that is looking for this, too? Am I the only one? Is that goal just too idealistic to become a reality? I don't know, but I'm willing to try it and see. And if you'd be willing to help me with the experiment, I'd like to hear from you.

    I'd need people who know how to get a game set up and running, a coder or two (with only some minimal input, really), people who are good with building, and maybe a person or two who's good with wiki stuff. Other than that, anyone else who might be interested would also have a place as plot-staff and such.

    If you're interested, feel free to message me and we can talk more in depth about it. Thanks for reading.


  • Pitcrew

    What makes the genre of superhero easier to do or more freeform? I don't understand, the genre of something rarely has anything to do with those things. I say a science fiction game with vampires set on a moon colony is just as much work as a game that involves people with varied and unique powers set in new york.


  • Pitcrew

    @DnvnQuinn said:

    What makes the genre of superhero easier to do or more freeform? I don't understand, the genre of something rarely has anything to do with those things. I say a science fiction game with vampires set on a moon colony is just as much work as a game that involves people with varied and unique powers set in new york.

    The commonplace conventions of a superhero/comic book MU are such that it is pretty easy to set up while still catering to most of the regular players's expectations.

    Usually, they are freeform, trait-based consent games. You don't really need a die roller that connects to a sheet; there are no corebooks or immense amounts of house rules to figure out.

    You essentially just need: a MU, a sheet, a grid, and an approval process. That's it. It's so much easier than, say, a WoD MU. Not easy, mind you, because I hesitate to call anything I can't do myself easy, but it's definitely easier--or at least, simpler and with less requirements.



  • @Coin said:

    @DnvnQuinn said:

    What makes the genre of superhero easier to do or more freeform? I don't understand, the genre of something rarely has anything to do with those things. I say a science fiction game with vampires set on a moon colony is just as much work as a game that involves people with varied and unique powers set in new york.

    The commonplace conventions of a superhero/comic book MU are such that it is pretty easy to set up while still catering to most of the regular players's expectations.

    Usually, they are freeform, trait-based consent games. You don't really need a die roller that connects to a sheet; there are no corebooks or immense amounts of house rules to figure out.

    You essentially just need: a MU, a sheet, a grid, and an approval process. That's it. It's so much easier than, say, a WoD MU. Not easy, mind you, because I hesitate to call anything I can't do myself easy, but it's definitely easier--or at least, simpler and with less requirements.

    That. Exactly.



  • @Coin said:

    You essentially just need: a MU, a sheet, a grid, and an approval process.

    You don't even need a +sheet, really. Just keep all the stats on the wiki. It's easier to read there too.


  • Pitcrew

    @TNP said:

    @Coin said:

    You essentially just need: a MU, a sheet, a grid, and an approval process.

    You don't even need a +sheet, really. Just keep all the stats on the wiki. It's easier to read there too.

    I know at least one person who would love to help with that when she's not busy dying stuff, right @surreality? XD


  • Pitcrew

    @Coin said:

    @DnvnQuinn said:

    What makes the genre of superhero easier to do or more freeform? I don't understand, the genre of something rarely has anything to do with those things. I say a science fiction game with vampires set on a moon colony is just as much work as a game that involves people with varied and unique powers set in new york.

    The commonplace conventions of a superhero/comic book MU are such that it is pretty easy to set up while still catering to most of the regular players's expectations.

    Usually, they are freeform, trait-based consent games. You don't really need a die roller that connects to a sheet; there are no corebooks or immense amounts of house rules to figure out.

    You essentially just need: a MU, a sheet, a grid, and an approval process. That's it. It's so much easier than, say, a WoD MU. Not easy, mind you, because I hesitate to call anything I can't do myself easy, but it's definitely easier--or at least, simpler and with less requirements.

    Ok and what is more involved in a non-wod vampire game set on the moon other than a Mu, A sheet, a grid and a approval process?


  • Pitcrew

    @DnvnQuinn said:

    @Coin said:

    @DnvnQuinn said:

    What makes the genre of superhero easier to do or more freeform? I don't understand, the genre of something rarely has anything to do with those things. I say a science fiction game with vampires set on a moon colony is just as much work as a game that involves people with varied and unique powers set in new york.

    The commonplace conventions of a superhero/comic book MU are such that it is pretty easy to set up while still catering to most of the regular players's expectations.

    Usually, they are freeform, trait-based consent games. You don't really need a die roller that connects to a sheet; there are no corebooks or immense amounts of house rules to figure out.

    You essentially just need: a MU, a sheet, a grid, and an approval process. That's it. It's so much easier than, say, a WoD MU. Not easy, mind you, because I hesitate to call anything I can't do myself easy, but it's definitely easier--or at least, simpler and with less requirements.

    Ok and what is more involved in a non-wod vampire game set on the moon other than a Mu, A sheet, a grid and a approval process?

    You're missing the point, which is at the very beginning of my post: conventional player expectations. People who play superhero MUs expect what I depicted above; people who play "non-wod vampire game set on the moon" don't exist because those games aren't around and thus there would be no expectations.

    As such, I suppose the difference is in attracting players, since with the former you have a large player base who know what to expect, and with the latter you... don't.


  • Pitcrew

    I'm not talking about expectation. Clearly.

    I'm talking about what makes one 'easier to do with little coding' and more freeform. That has nothing to do with expectation.


  • Pitcrew

    @DnvnQuinn said:

    I'm not talking about expectation. Clearly.

    I'm talking about what makes one 'easier to do with little coding' and more freeform. That has nothing to do with expectation.

    This is a stupid statement. It's easier to run because the expectations exist. It has everything to do with expectation.


  • Pitcrew

    @DnvnQuinn said:

    I'm not talking about expectation. Clearly.

    I'm talking about what makes one 'easier to do with little coding' and more freeform. That has nothing to do with expectation.

    You are talking about it, because that's what the original poster meant when they used those terms-- as evidenced by my clarification and their pointing and going "yeah, what he said". Are you reading or are you just looking for "there is nothing technical that is easier between a superhero game and a vampires-on-the-moon game"? Because if that's what you want to hear, then sure, you're technically correct, which might be the best kind of correct, but it still makes you come off a bit obtuse in this regard.



  • @Coin said:

    @TNP said:

    @Coin said:

    You essentially just need: a MU, a sheet, a grid, and an approval process.

    You don't even need a +sheet, really. Just keep all the stats on the wiki. It's easier to read there too.

    I know at least one person who would love to help with that when she's not busy dying stuff, right @surreality? XD

    I have some wiki magic for that, more or less. Or can dev stuff. I don't know when exactly, but I did have a proto sheet thing for an OT worked up at one point that did calculations and whatnot.


  • Pitcrew

    @Sunny You're a stupid expectation!

    I'm just saying the 'genre' of something has nothing to do with the ease of coding something.

    That and isn't pretty much every freeform mush failing right now? Isn't there a whole thread on that?


  • Pitcrew

    @DnvnQuinn said:

    @Sunny You're a stupid expectation!

    I'm just saying the 'genre' of something has nothing to do with the ease of coding something.

    But it does, because if the expectation is "less code reliant" then it's easier.

    That and isn't pretty much every freeform mush failing right now? Isn't there a whole thread on that?

    In comparison to what other genre and evidences by what?


  • Pitcrew

    I might be confusing freeform with sandbox...



  • It is about expectations, though. Most games, that I've seen are set in a certain number of ways. Homebrew settings often come with some sort of system of stats and abilities, or the games are based off an existing ruleset such as WoD or D&D or some other game. Now, granted, my experience with MU*s is still pretty limited to only a few genres, but really the only games I see that are consistently rules-light/consent based are the comic book based games. Sure... anyone could make a game that has little to no rules that involves vampires on the moon... but we don't see those. So, we (or at least I, and apparently others, as well) don't think of that. I went straight to what I know has a playerbase, and is something that I, myself, have a pretty rock solid working knowledge of.


  • Pitcrew

    @DnvnQuinn said:

    @Sunny You're a stupid expectation!

    I'm just saying the 'genre' of something has nothing to do with the ease of coding something.

    But it does. Because some players who stick to particular sorts of genres expect particular sorts of code.

    That and isn't pretty much every freeform mush failing right now? Isn't there a whole thread on that?

    Could you name for me a genre of mushes which you think aren't failing, right now?


  • Pitcrew

    @Sunny said:

    @DnvnQuinn said:

    @Sunny You're a stupid expectation!

    I'm just saying the 'genre' of something has nothing to do with the ease of coding something.

    But it does. Because some players who stick to particular sorts of genres expect particular sorts of code.

    That and isn't pretty much every freeform mush failing right now? Isn't there a whole thread on that?

    Could you name for me a genre of mushes which you think aren't failing, right now?

    @Sunny, stop copying my interrogatory posts! YOU COPYCAT!


  • Pitcrew

    @Sunny TS, FURRY, BDSM Mushes. According to MudStats at least.


  • Pitcrew

    @Coin said:

    @Sunny said:

    @DnvnQuinn said:

    @Sunny You're a stupid expectation!

    I'm just saying the 'genre' of something has nothing to do with the ease of coding something.

    But it does. Because some players who stick to particular sorts of genres expect particular sorts of code.

    That and isn't pretty much every freeform mush failing right now? Isn't there a whole thread on that?

    Could you name for me a genre of mushes which you think aren't failing, right now?

    @Sunny, stop copying my interrogatory posts! YOU COPYCAT!

    Shut up, I said it better.

    ETA: @DnvnQuinn -- so following your logic, why should anyone be doing something besides one of those sorts of games? FFS.


 

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