Recipes!


  • Pitcrew

    Share 'em, ask for 'em, discuss 'em. Whatevs.

    Anyway! I tried this InstantPot recipe for yogurt a few days ago and the only thing I want to do next time is a higher quality of 'starter' yogurt (you use a couple tablespoons to kick it off) and to strain the final result to make it thicker. Overall? It was super easy and I got half a gallon of plain yogurt for just a couple dollars of ingredients.

    Considering yogurt is one of my primary go-to breakfasts, this is totally worth while for me. The effort involved was really low (it's mostly just 8 hours of wait time). The next step is just figuring out amounts of vanilla to mix in (a tricksy prospect).

    My next is gonna be making chicken pho (using this recipe). Just waiting on a couple items from Amazon (primarily a small strainer so I can skim the broth). Considering how much the recipe I chose makes, I'll likely end up freezing half the result. I think that's the best part of the thing for me: as a single person, I can make a lot of food in an afternoon/evening and have plenty of leftovers. With my fibro and limited free time, that's a bonus.


  • Politics

    @auspice said in Recipes!:

    I think that's the best part of the thing for me: as a single person, I can make a lot of food in an afternoon/evening and have plenty of leftovers. With my fibro and limited free time, that's a bonus.

    The best part about being a single person is making whatever fuck kind of food you want, and not have to worry about monkey-shits or a picky partner that don't understand the tender love and care necessary to make Chinese pot-stickers from scratch.

    Or a char-siu-inspired roasted pork tenderloin.

    Fall-off-the-bone whole roasted chickens in InstantPots.

    Because I like to cook.

    Not that anyone in this goddamned townhouse seems to give a fuck.

    Ingrates.


  • Pitcrew

    @ganymede said in Recipes!:

    @auspice said in Recipes!:

    I think that's the best part of the thing for me: as a single person, I can make a lot of food in an afternoon/evening and have plenty of leftovers. With my fibro and limited free time, that's a bonus.

    The best part about being a single person is making whatever fuck kind of food you want, and not have to worry about monkey-shits or a picky partner that don't understand the tender love and care necessary to make Chinese pot-stickers from scratch.

    Or a char-siu-inspired roasted pork tenderloin.

    Fall-off-the-bone whole roasted chickens in InstantPots.

    Because I like to cook.

    Not that anyone in this goddamned townhouse seems to give a fuck.

    Ingrates.

    I want all of those foods. :(

    I'm not a picky eater. My stomach, however, is. We argue often.

    Me: 'I wanna eat...'
    Stomach: 'No. I'm angry and I will be furious with you unless all you put in me is bread, broth, or grilled chicken.'
    Me: 'But... but...'
    Stomach: 'MAYBE I'LL BE FURIOUS NO MATTER WHAT.'
    Me: :(

    So when my stomach isn't being shitty, I like to experiment and have fun with what I cook. I've also been trying a variety of wing recipes. The ones I've tried so far:
    Old Bay Chicken Wings
    Maple-Chipotle Hot Wings
    Honey BBQ Wings

    The Maple-Chipotle are my favorite of those 3. I'm still hunting for a good garlic parm wing recipe (the ones I've tried so far have been meh). I think the wings in my freezer right now are destined for this: Lemon Pepper with Dark Soy and Honey



  • My take on baked potato soup:

    Potatoes: Baked
    Bacon
    Onion (not red/purple)
    Milk
    Salt & Pepper
    Baked potato toppings: Chives, shredded cheddar, bacon bits, sour cream, etc.

    (I don't use/give amounts for the various ingredients because this is totally something you can do to taste or based on what you have on hand.)

    Bake potatoes until just a little over the done stage and saute onions and bacon together (bacon won't get crispy). Drain a little of the grease off if you want but don't drain it entirely as it flavors the soup along with the bacon/onion mixture. When the potatoes are done you cut them open and put the tater innards into the pot with the mixture and add milk until it's the desired consistency you want. I tend to go for something between a thinner mashed potato and a thicker chowder base after everything's mashed together. Heat through, salt and pepper to taste (most likely won't need too much salt due to the bacon) and serve with baked potato toppings if desired.

    (This is not diet/artery friendly, consider yourself warned!)

    ETA: To give an example of what measurements I use for a very hungry family of four:

    1 bag of potatoes (usually use the whole thing since these potatoes tend to be on the small side)
    1-1 1/2 pound of bacon (some brands are just a pound, others a pound and a half)
    1 large yellow or white onion
    However much milk needed for desired consistency - usually about half a gallon


  • Pitcrew

    @apu said in Recipes!:

    My take on baked potato soup:

    Potatoes: Baked
    Bacon
    Onion (not red/purple)
    Milk
    Salt & Pepper
    Baked potato toppings: Chives, shredded cheddar, bacon bits, sour cream, etc.

    (I don't use/give amounts for the various ingredients because this is totally something you can do to taste or based on what you have on hand.)

    Bake potatoes until just a little over the done stage and saute onions and bacon together (bacon won't get crispy). Drain a little of the grease off if you want but don't drain it entirely as it flavors the soup along with the bacon/onion mixture. When the potatoes are done you cut them open and put the tater innards into the pot with the mixture and add milk until it's the desired consistency you want. I tend to go for something between a thinner mashed potato and a thicker chowder base after everything's mashed together. Heat through, salt and pepper to taste (most likely won't need too much salt due to the bacon) and serve with baked potato toppings if desired.

    (This is not diet/artery friendly, consider yourself warned!)

    ETA: To give an example of what measurements I use for a very hungry family of four:

    1 bag of potatoes (usually use the whole thing since these potatoes tend to be on the small side)
    1-1 1/2 pound of bacon (some brands are just a pound, others a pound and a half)
    1 large yellow or white onion
    However much milk needed for desired consistency - usually about half a gallon

    What size bag? Weight wise?



  • @ortallus

    I think they are a five pound bag. They are the potatoes that come in the brown plastic bags.


  • Pitcrew

    So I have a whole chicken that's too big for my InstantPot.

    ...suggestions?


  • Pitcrew

    @auspice said in Recipes!:

    So I have a whole chicken that's too big for my InstantPot.

    ...suggestions?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_nxFjhcyTMQ


  • Pitcrew

    Chicken Fajitas (my go-to "impress someone" meal from High School through... well... now). Let it be clear from the start that for cooking (not baking, just cooking), I am of the "Yeah, that looks about right" school of thought, so measurements will be rough.

    Chicken Breasts (2ish whole breasts, or enough tenders to make up a similar amount of meat)
    Lime juice (fresh squeezed is best, but bottled is fine, about 1/2 cup)
    Olive Oil (about 1/2 cup)
    Oregano (a generous amount, several heavy shakes)
    Black Pepper (a generous amount, but not as much as the oregano)

    Put all of the above in a container (tupperware or bag) to marinade. Best overnight, but 1-2 hours is still okay.

    Grill the chicken, throw away the leftover marinade.

    Serve on warm tortillas (Costco frozen uncooked are the best short of homemade), with cheese, avocado, salsa, sour cream, lettuce, black beans (cooked with chili powder, cumin, garlic, oregano, and a splash of tequila), and whatever else you like to put in a soft taco/fajita. 2 tortillas worth of chicken each for 3-4.

    If you want fajita veggies, saute up julienned onions and green peppers in a little olive oil, oregano, and chili powder.

    It takes about 30 minutes of actual work, and you can easily double, triple, or even quadruple the recipe if you've got a big party (of course, it takes a long-ass time to cook tortillas for 12-16).


  • Pitcrew

    @ganymede I. Feel. This. So. Much.

    My current partner is of the "what you make is amazing, but also I love Taco Bell" variety so I can never quite trust if he means it or if he's just content to eat so he doesn't die and anything would be fine.


  • Politics

    @darinelle said in Recipes!:

    My current partner is of the "what you make is amazing, but also I love Taco Bell" variety so I can never quite trust if he means it or if he's just content to eat so he doesn't die and anything would be fine.

    Normally, I would just treat my partner like the kids, and tell her shut the fuck up and eat what I put in front of you because it is going inside of you through one end or the other. But she's smart, has keys to a vehicle, and can drive to Taco Bell herself.

    Bitch.



  • Hehe! My gramma used to say: 'Mouth, needle, or rectum. One way or the other, it's going you.'



  • @auspice Belatedly.. spatchcocking is great for when something is too big as a whole but you don't want to lose the pieces.



  • Take a whack of frozen brussels sprouts, put them in a cast iron pan.
    Take a few frozen pyrogies, put them in the pan.
    Add some tempeh or tofu or seitan, (you should know the drill by now) and put it in the pan.

    Cover all with some oil, then add pressed garlic, some salt and pepper.

    Cook for 20 in an oven at 350, give it a stir, and put it back in for 15-20 depending if you run a hot or cool 350.

    Orgasm.


  • Pitcrew

    http://pressureluckcooking.com/recipe/instant-pot-egg-drop-soup/

    Easy and delicious. But instant pot makes it even easier for sick days.


  • Pitcrew

    Modification of an old beef stew recipe. It works best in a cast iron Dutch oven; but if you don't have one do all your cooking in a cast iron skillet, then transfer the bits into a stew pot after deglazing the pan with the beer. You can substitute beef or chicken chunks if you don't feel like eating Bambi.

    Ingredients
    4 slices bacon, cut into small pieces
    2 1/2 pounds boneless venison, cut into 1 to 2-inch pieces
    1 teaspoon salt, or more to taste
    freshly ground black pepper to taste
    2 onions, coarsely chopped
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    4 cloves garlic, minced
    1 (14.9 ounce) can dark beer (such as Guinness)
    1/4 cup tomato paste
    4 sprigs fresh thyme
    3 carrots, cut into 1-inch pieces
    2 stalks celery, cut into 1-inch pieces
    1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, or to taste
    2 1/2 cups chicken stock, or as needed to cover
    4 cups mashed potatoes (optional)

    Directions
    Cook and stir bacon in a heavy Dutch oven over medium-high heat until bacon is browned and crisp, 3 to 4 minutes. Turn off heat and transfer bacon to layered paper towels, reserving bacon fat in the pot.

    Season venison cubes generously with 1 teaspoon salt and black pepper to taste. Turn heat to high under Dutch oven and sear beef pieces in the hot fat on both sides until browned, about 5 minutes. Remove meat and place in large bowl with bacon. Turn heat down to medium; cook and stir onions in the retained fat until lightly browned, 5 to 8 minutes; season with a large pinch of salt.

    Cook garlic with onions until soft, about 1 minute; pour beer into pot and stir with a wooden spoon, scraping up and dissolving any browned bits of food into the liquid. Add meat/bacon mixture (or transfer everything to a stew pot if you're not cooking in a Dutch oven). Stir in tomato paste, thyme sprigs, carrots, celery, sugar, 1/2 teaspoon black pepper, and enough chicken broth to cover.

    Bring stew to a gentle simmer, stirring to combine; reduce heat to low and cover pot. Simmer stew until meat is fork-tender, about 2 hours. Stir stew occasionally and skim fat or foam if desired.

    Remove cover and raise heat to medium-high. Bring stew to a low boil and cook until stew has slightly thickened, 15 to 20 minutes. Remove and discard thyme sprigs and adjust salt and pepper to taste.

    Arrange mashed potatoes in a ring in a serving bowl; ladle stew into the center of the potatoes.



  • Here's a country-style pancake recipe based on how my grandmother always made them (and how I still do):

    For every full cup of mix, use equal parts regular pancake mix, buckwheat, and corn meal (ex: 1 cup = 1/3 cup of each)

    For every cup of mix, add 1 egg, a small amount of oil (a couple tablespoons, basically), and milk mixed to your desired consistency (more for a thinner pancake, less for a thicker one). One cup of mix should do three or four medium-sized pancakes.

    Note you can probably do this with a pancake mix that takes water instead of milk, but I've always bought the mix that calls for milk instead.

    Heat a skillet to medium high heat (about halfway on an electric stove) and melt some vegetable shortening. Once you've poured the batter on, move the skillet around so the shortening gets in along the edges and turn the stove down a level after about a minute.

    This gets a nice, crispy ring around the edge of the pancake and it has a nice crunch once you start eating it.

    Or, I could just show:

    Pancake goodness



  • @ganymede I've done my own potstickers before, yes. I've also done my own sushi rolls a couple times. Cooking only for myself is certainly a luxury of some kind.

    If anyone here likes cooking with spice rubs, do yourself a favor and get your ass over to spiceologist.com right now. (Pro tip: go as far as putting in your e-mail address, don't complete your order, and within a couple days you'll probably get a 25% off coupon code in your inbox because they want to try to capture potential customers).

    I found them a few years ago during a Kickstarter campaign and I love a number of their rubs, particularly Smoky Honey Habanero, Black Magic, Chile Margarita, and Greek Freak. Most of what they make, I've enjoyed. I often use different rubs when I grill up some chicken thighs and mix something into the rice I cook to go with them, but I like using a bit of Black Magic or Smoky Honey Habanero on peas, corn, and stuff like that as well. I've done homemade potato chips or fries with those sprinkled on, too.

    I guess I'd better show an example of that, yeah?

    Chips!



  • BEHOLD I COME BEARING GIFTS!

    BEHOLD THE JOY THAT IS MAANGCHI!

    JOYOUS KOREAN FOOD FOR ALL!


  • Pitcrew

    Holy shit, y'all.

    Instant Pot Wild Rice Soup

    If you have an Instant Pot, you need to try this.

    It's so good.
    My bechamel (what they have you make to add at the end) came out so thick it turned mine into more of a stew than a soup BUT I DON'T CARE IT'S SO FUCKING DELICIOUS.

    Next time I make this I am gonna make a loaf of nice crusty bread to eat with it and homg.


 

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